Want create site? Find Free WordPress Themes and plugins.

Practice Statement: Abuse and Neglect

People are never subjected to abuse, neglect, mistreatment and/or exploitation of any kind. No one will threaten or intimidate people to make them comply with polices or individual staff preferences. People will live and work free of physical or mental harm. Abuse and neglect are unacceptable.

Practice Definition: Abuse and Neglect

What would be observed in practice:

  • People are not subjected to actions, by anyone, that cause them physical or emotional harm
  • All allegations of abuse and neglect, regardless of the source, are addressed
  • Staff recognise and report any suspected incidents of abuse and neglect
  • Support is always provided for the person who has been potentially victimised
  • All staff in their houses/centres/community services are familiar with the Detecting and Reporting Abuse Policy and procedure

Role-based Resources

Residential Staff

Discussion Questions

  1. Why are people in residential services more at risk of abuse and neglect than the general population?
  2. Discuss the news article:
    • What factors contributed to the neglect occurring? (i.e. personal, society, government etc.)
    • What should the occupational therapist have done?
  3. What should we do if we suspect that abuse or neglect has occurred to one of the people we support?

Activities

Quiz

News Article

Case Study:

Types of abuse:

  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Neglect
  • Financial abuse
  1. Carey is a 25-year old man who lives in a residential home. He has autism and a mild learning disability. He is extremely sensitive to touch and he occasionally scratches and hits himself when he gets frustrated with the way certain clothes or seats feel as they touch his skin. During a recent visit home, his father noticed bruises on both of his upper arms. He asked Carey about them and Carey said it was a secret. Carey’s dad asked him who else knew the secret, and Carey answered “Drew”, one of the staff members at his Adult Day Training Programme.
    What might you suspect? What should Carey’s dad do?
  2. You work in a residential group home where Maria has been a resident for several years. Maria is an engaging young woman who is always smiling and enjoys social interaction with both the other residents of the home and the staff there. Maria is non-verbal and will often indicate her needs and choices by pointing or shaking her head in response to simple yes/no questions. Recently you have been noticing a sudden change in Maria’s behaviour when you try to help with her shower. She appears terrified to go into the bathroom and cries and shakes her head whenever staff try to lead her in that direction. You also notice that she has been coming home from school with wet clothes in her backpack when she previously had no problems using the bathroom.
    What might you suspect? What should you do?
  3. You are a relative of Jacob, who is a 29-year old man with a learning disability who lives in a two bedroom house with a flatmate. Jacob also receives Home Support services from a provider who comes in once a week to help him pay his bills and balance his cheque book. As Jacob’s relative you usually take him to the library and then stop for a soda on the way home. One afternoon, Jacob says he can’t buy a soda because he doesn’t have the money. Upon further questioning you learn that he doesn’t have the money because his home support worker has been taking money from him (which the support worker says is to pay for his bus fare to Jacob’s apartment).
    What might you suspect? What should you do?

Service Coordinator Notes:

  1. Emphasise that Abuse and Neglect can occur especially in settings such as houses where staff hold a lot of power over people. People can also be abusive to each other.
  2. Neglect likely occurred in the article in an incremental (a bit at a time) way and because there was no one checking up on the woman. At Spectrum there are a number of staff who work in each house, not to mention other Spectrum Care staff and natural supports visiting houses.
  3. Emphasize that the policy is zero-tolerance and that all suspected abuse and neglect must be reported. It’s better to over-report than to let any abuse remain un-detected. Note it is also a crime to not report abuse and neglect:
    • Under the Crimes Amendment Act No3 2011:
      • Staff working at the same residence where abuse or neglect has been detected and were aware of the abuse may also be reported to the Police for possible investigation and prosecution. (Any person found liable, could face a term of up to 10 years imprisonment).
      • Any person over the age of 18 years and living in the same house, or regarded as a member of that particular household and fails to protect the child or vulnerable adult, knows that the victim is at risk of death, grievous bodily harm, or sexual assault and fails to take reasonable steps to protect or report that abuse may be liable for a term of imprisonment up to 10 years.

Community Services

Discussion Questions

  1. Why are people with disabilities more at risk of abuse and neglect than the general population?
  2. What can constitute Abuse and Neglect when a person is accessing Aspirations/Home Support services?
  3. What should we do if we suspect that abuse or neglect has occurred to one of the people we support (both in and outside of our service)?

Activities

Case Study:

Types of abuse:

  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Neglect
  • Financial abuse
    1. Carey is a 25-year old man who lives in a residential home. He has autism and mild mental retardation. He is extremely sensitive to touch and he occasionally scratches and hits himself when he gets frustrated with the way certain clothes or seats feel as they touch his skin. During a recent visit home, his father noticed bruises on both of his upper arms. He asked Carey about them and Carey said it was a secret. Carey’s dad asked him who else knew the secret, and Carey answered “Drew”, one of the staff members at his Adult Day Training Programme.
      What might you suspect? What should Carey’s dad do?
    2. You are a relative of Jacob, who is a 29-year old man with mild intellectual disabilities who lives in a two bedroom house with a flatmate. Jacob also receives Home Support services from a provider who comes in once a week to help him pay his bills and balance his cheque book. As Jacob’s relative you usually take him to the library and then stop for a soda on the way home. One afternoon, Jacob says he can’t buy a soda because he doesn’t have the money. Upon further questioning you learn that he doesn’t have the money because his home support worker has been taking money from him (which the support worker says is to pay for his bus fare to Jacob’s apartment).
      What might you suspect? What should you do?
    3. You work at an Aspirations Centre and notice that Joseph, a 39-year old man who uses a wheelchair, usually arrives at the Centre in dirty clothes and is wearing a diaper that looks like it hasn’t been changed since the night before. Over the past several weeks, it looks like Joseph appears to be losing weight. When you took him into the bathroom to change his diaper you notice that he has a number of large pressure sores on his buttocks.
      What might you suspect? What should you do?

Service Coordinator Notes:

  1. Emphasise the responsibility that staff have to the people they support to keep them safe. Also note that in situations where people have power over others, such as at Aspirations sites or Home Support situations abuse is more likely to occur.
  2. Even when a person is not supported by staff 100% of the time abuse and neglect can occur.
  3. Emphasize that the policy is zero-tolerance and that all suspected abuse and neglect must be reported. It’s better to over-report than to let any abuse remain un-detected.

Hub and Support Staff

Discussion Questions

  1. What kinds of Abuse and Neglect is our team likely to encounter? Provide examples of how you could encounter it and what you would do about it.
  2. Would the measures described in Q2 prevent what occurred in the news article occurring in one of Spectrum’s facilities? If not, what else can we do?
Information:
To abuse someone is to harm or hurt them in some way or violate their human or civil rights. Abuse can take many forms, including but not limited to:
  • physical abuse – a wilful act carried out to cause pain or injury to disabled people
  • sexual abuse – forcing someone to take part in sexual activity against their will or with consent gained through coercion
  • verbal abuse – using disrespectful, derogatory or demeaning language either about or in conversation with disabled people; this language presents disabled people as less important, child-like or inferior to others
  • emotional abuse – including making verbal threats against, harassing or intimidating a person. Emotional abuse can occur when disabled people are not able to make independent decisions and determine their own identity. It can also occur through restricting a person’s social, intellectual and emotional growth or wellbeing
  • financial abuse – wrongfully using another person’s assets, income, benefit or New Zealand Superannuation or using force or coercion to prevent a person from using their own assets
  • neglect and poor practice – not providing the essentials for life such as adequate nutrition, medication and other health requirements, adequate heating and fresh air. It may involve not meeting disability needs, or not providing necessary equipment or support
  • restrictive practices – restraining or isolating someone for reasons other than medical necessity or to prevent immediate self-harm (Kruger and Moon 1999).

SOURCE: The Prevention and Management of Abuse: Guide for Services funded by Disability Support Services pg 9

Activities

Case Study:

Types of abuse:

  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Neglect
  • Financial abuse
    1. Carey is a 25-year old man who lives in a residential home. He has autism and mild mental retardation. He is extremely sensitive to touch and he occasionally scratches and hits himself when he gets frustrated with the way certain clothes or seats feel as they touch his skin. During a recent visit home, his father noticed bruises on both of his upper arms. He asked Carey about them and Carey said it was a secret. Carey’s dad asked him who else knew the secret, and Carey answered “Drew”, one of the staff members at his Adult Day Training Programme.
      What might you suspect? What should Carey’s dad do?
    2. You are a relative of Jacob, who is a 29-year old man with mild intellectual disabilities who lives in a two bedroom house with a flatmate. Jacob also receives Home Support services from a provider who comes in once a week to help him pay his bills and balance his cheque book. As Jacob’s relative you usually take him to the library and then stop for a soda on the way home. One afternoon, Jacob says he can’t buy a soda because he doesn’t have the money. Upon further questioning you learn that he doesn’t have the money because his home support worker has been taking money from him (which the support worker says is to pay for his bus fare to Jacob’s apartment).
      What might you suspect? What should you do?
    3. You work at an Aspirations Centre and notice that Joseph, a 39-year old man who uses a wheelchair, usually arrives at the Centre in dirty clothes and is wearing a diaper that looks like it hasn’t been changed since the night before. Over the past several weeks, it looks like Joseph appears to be losing weight. When you took him into the bathroom to change his diaper you notice that he has a number of large pressure sores on his buttocks.
      What might you suspect? What should you do?

News Article

Managers and Coordinators

Discussion Questions

  1. What values and behaviours do we personally model and reward to encourage services that are safe for all the people who use them?
  2. In response to the blog post “Well, He Asked”, what can we (both personally and at an organisational level) do to better prevent bullying and abuse at a person-to-person level?
  3. When an allegation of abuse has occurred how do we as an organisation create a safe and supportive environment for the reporter of abuse?
  4. Discuss the 2 scenarios in the Case Study.

Activities

Blog

Policy

Case Study:

  • Fictional case study 1:
    Sara lives in a house with flatmates who, like her, have disabilities. She has supported living for 20 hours a week to help her with activities like cooking and cleaning. Sara likes most of her flatmates but is a bit scared of one of them. For some time he has been commenting to her about her body and making her feel uncomfortable by standing too close to her. The support worker notices she is getting quite withdrawn and sad but doesn’t really know why. Family are also worried about her. They think Sara is just a bit down and take Sara to the doctor to see if she should go on antidepressants. Sara does.
    One night Sara’s flatmate comes into her room and sexually assaults her. Sara blames herself and doesn’t know what to do. She keeps it to herself. She tells her support worker she wants to move but her support worker tells her that it will be really hard to find somewhere else for her to live. A couple of months later Sara is talking to her mum and tells her what happened. Her mum contacts the police, who investigate but do not charge the flatmate because they do not have enough evidence. Sara’s mum takes her to live at home with the family until she can find somewhere else to live. The flatmate who assaulted her remains in the house.
    Q – As a provider, what could you have done to achieve a better outcome for Sara?
  • Fictional case study 2
    David is a deaf blind man in his 40s. He lives alone and has a support worker coming to his home once a week to provide household management, such as help with cleaning and purchasing groceries. David prefers to communicate through his computer, which has a Braille display attached. However, even though he has advised people on several occasions that he cannot use the phone (which he only has for emergencies) and does not always know when someone is at the door, others are not using the computer to communicate. He has had to reapply for household management because he lost his support when he did not respond to callers by phone or at the door. David had to complain to the Needs Assessment and Support Coordination service recently because his support worker was arriving late and leaving early. He also believes that money and small personal items have gone missing on several occasions after the support worker has been.
    Q – As a provider, what could you have done to achieve a better outcome for David?

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.