Practice Statement: Active Support

Active Support is designed to ensure people have the chance to be fully involved in their own lives, and receive the right range and level of support to be successful.

Providing Active Support bridges the gap between what people can and cannot do. It’s easier for people to control their lives and meet their day-to-day needs when they have the skills and knowledge to act independently.

With well-judged assistance, everyone can be involved in every activity that concerns them. Assisting people effectively and structuring activities so that the steps match their abilities are key parts of Active Support.

Practice Definition: Active Support

What would be observed in practice:

  • People are engaged in activities and support staff are seen to fill in the gaps to help ensure success
  • People are encouraged to be part of their local community and there is evidence of belonging, inclusion, interaction, participation and engagement
  • Relationships with friends and family are encouraged and supported
  • People are involved in discussions, tasks and activities
  • Opportunities are presented to gain experience and develop new skills
  • Support is evident in allowing people to make choices, increase their communication skills, increase empowerment and increase control over their lives
  • People are always afforded status and respect
  • Each person is treated as an individual and supported to achieve personal goals
  • Each person is supported to do whatever they’re able for themselves
  • There is an emphasis on people gaining increased independence
  • Support people are enablers, not caregivers
  • People are given the opportunity to learn from their mistakes
  • Support is not rushed, and people are not overwhelmed by interference and noise

Role-based Resources

Residential Staff

Discussion Questions

  1.  What does good Active Support look like when out in the community? Provide an example of a time when you provided good Active Support OUTSIDE of the home and complete a task analysis of the example.
  2. What does it mean when someone keeps saying “no” to participating in Active Support activities? How can you show them respect while also encouraging them to actively participate?
  3. In your own words, how does Active Support contribute to the other practices in the Practice Framework?

Activities

  1. Task Analysis exercise
    Task Analysis exercise example
  2. Active Support and other Practices:
    • Communication
      • Active Support provides frequent and consistent opportunities for people to communicate about real activities and experiences, participate in social interactions and to express their own opinions, feelings and preferences
    • Socially Valued Roles
      • Active Support provides the opportunity for people to learn more skills which they can then apply to socially valued roles
    • Person Centred Approach
      • By practicing Active Support, staff get the opportunity to learn about individual strengths, preferences and needs and possible directions and aspirations of people
    • Outcomes
      • As above – it provides possible directions and aspirations grounded in real life experiences
    • Rights
      • Active Support gives more opportunities to exercise choice and control
    • Complete the Task Analysis exercise with an example of Active Support when out in the community. (Eg buying a coffee, chatting with friends, greeting regulars on the beach)

Community Services

Discussion Questions

  1. What does good Active Support look like when out in the community? Provide an example of a time when you provided good Active Support OUTSIDE of the (home OR centre).
  2. What does it mean when someone keeps saying “no” to participating in Active Support activities? How can you show them respect while also encouraging them to actively participate?
  3. Complete the Task Analysis exercise with an example of Active Support when out in the community. (Eg buying a coffee, chatting with friends, greeting regulars on the beach)?

Activities

    Click on the link to access the recourses below:

  1. Task Analysis exercise
  2.  Task Analysis exercise example

Respite Services

Discussion Questions

  1.  What does good Active Support look like when out in the community? Provide an example of a time when you provided good Active Support OUTSIDE of the (home OR centre).
  2. What does it mean when someone keeps saying “no” to participating in Active Support activities? How can you show them respect while also encouraging them to actively participate?
  3. Complete the Task Analysis exercise with an example of Active Support when out in the community. (Eg buying a coffee, chatting with friends, greeting regulars on the beach)?

Managers and Coordinators

Discussion Questions

  1. Read the findings in the attached article. In your experience how important are each of the clusters in supporting the quality of life of people with disabilities? Do the findings in the article correspond with your experience?
    1. Staff practice
    2. Managerial practice
    3. Culture
    4. Organisational characteristics, policies and processes
    5. Training
    6. Staff characteristics
    7. Resources
    8. Settings
    9. The external environment
  2. With work underway to move towards more coaching by direct managers (ie Service Coordinators), what do you think the Spectrum Care needs to do in order to make this practice successful?

Activities

    Click on the links below to access the resources prescribed.

  1. Quality of Life in Supported Accommodation

Read the summary of each cluster of findings pg 183 – 195 (ie staff practice, managerial practice, culture etc.)